Ebbets Field flagpole arrives at Flatbush & Atlantic
by Andrew Shilling
Dec 19, 2012 | 1170 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Left to right: Brett Yormark, Brooklyn Nets CEO, Jerry Stackhouse, Marty Markowitz, Sharon Robinson, Bruce Ratner and David Diamante, voice of the Nets.
Left to right: Brett Yormark, Brooklyn Nets CEO, Jerry Stackhouse, Marty Markowitz, Sharon Robinson, Bruce Ratner and David Diamante, voice of the Nets.
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The Barclays Center is now home to the Brookyln Nets, however over a half-century ago, Brooklyn Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley hoped the intersection of Flatbush and Atlantic avenues would be home to a new baseball stadium.

That didn't happen and the team moved to Los Angeles, but a piece of the dodgers old Brooklyn home, Ebbets Field, did finally make it.

With the help of Bruce Ratner, developer and majority owner of Barclays Center, and Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, a flagpole that was at Ebbets Field until the stadium’s demolition in 1960 now stands proudly at the intersection outside the Barclays Center.

“I’ve dreamed about this day for so many years,” Ratner said, recalling back in 2007 when he said they purchased the flagpole from a nearby church. “We remember so much about Jackie Robinson, and when you think about this flag. Think about the fact that every day he played from April 15, 1947, he looked at this flag.”

He spoke before a small, but growing crowd in anticipation of the Nets/Knicks game to be played later that night.

Sharon Robinson, daughter of the famed Brooklyn slugger, was on hand for the ceremony, as was current Nets guard Jerry Stackhouse.

“This flagpole is a representative of the past, and will bring this community together,” Robinson said. “Brooklyn to me is community, it is love, it is the Brooklyn Dodgers and now it is the Brooklyn Nets.”

Stackhouse wears number 42 in honor of Robinson. He helped raise the Brooklyn Net’s flag up the pole, marking the beginning of a new generation in Brooklyn.

“Jackie Robinson means so much to African-American athletes like myself, and without his contributions and what he was able to do, we wouldn’t be able to the things we’re doing today,” Stackhouse said. “I wear that number with tremendous honor and I look forward to carrying what he stood for into the next generation.”
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